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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I plan on vinyl wrapping my door handles, and since that requires removing the side panels, I figured I might as well throw in some sound deadening mats in before sealing it all back up. From what I've seen, people place mats almost everywhere in the vehicle, like under the carpet. I'm only looking to do the side doors, but how much of a difference would that even make?
 

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Probably not much gain in just the doors. It will help, but if you really want to cut the sound you need to do a full floor blanket as well as the side panels and rear hatch in the cargo area.

11567
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Probably not much gain in just the doors. It will help, but if you really want to cut the sound you need to do a full floor blanket as well as the side panels and rear hatch in the cargo area.

View attachment 11567
That would definitely cut noise, but it's a little too labor intensive for now. Looks awesome though!
 

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What glass does your EX-L come with? My Touring has the noise reduction side and front windshield glass. That too will matter.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
What glass does your EX-L come with? My Touring has the noise reduction side and front windshield glass. That too will matter.
I honestly have no idea. What does the 2021 Passport EX-L AWD come stock with? I can check the Passport later, but where would I even look to see what type of windshield is installed?
 

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I honestly have no idea. What does the 2021 Passport EX-L AWD come stock with? I can check the Passport later, but where would I even look to see what type of windshield is installed?
Acoustic glass is used in the Touring and Elite. I would think that you would be able to tell from the Window Sticker. Obviously if the glass is acoustic glass the sound blankets in the door will do more than if the EX-L doesn't have acoustic glass.
 

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I plan on vinyl wrapping my door handles, and since that requires removing the side panels, I figured I might as well throw in some sound deadening mats in before sealing it all back up. From what I've seen, people place mats almost everywhere in the vehicle, like under the carpet. I'm only looking to do the side doors, but how much of a difference would that even make?
Big difference, when done right, make sure you do every possible place in there.

A great test is to knock on the outside of the door, before sound deadening sounds hollow and metallic, after: it sounds full and solid...
 

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Acoustic glass is used in the Touring and Elite. I would think that you would be able to tell from the Window Sticker. Obviously if the glass is acoustic glass the sound blankets in the door will do more than if the EX-L doesn't have acoustic glass.
Yes it does in the windshield, but not on the front windows.....
 

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If you want to reduce the noise, put Mass Loaded Vinyl under your floor mats. We put Dynamite on our floors and doors with little noise reduction but the MLV does the trick. We have an EX-L. If you decide to do the door panels you only need to cover about half for full effect; we covered it all prior to reading that cost saving recommendation.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
If you want to reduce the noise, put Mass Loaded Vinyl under your floor mats. We put Dynamite on our floors and doors with little noise reduction but the MLV does the trick. We have an EX-L. If you decide to do the door panels you only need to cover about half for full effect; we covered it all prior to reading that cost saving recommendation.
Thanks. If I ever give the Passport the full sound deadening treatment, then I'll look into adding MLV. For now, I think I'll just slap some of those mats on the side doors.
 

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If you want to reduce the noise, put Mass Loaded Vinyl under your floor mats. We put Dynamite on our floors and doors with little noise reduction but the MLV does the trick. We have an EX-L. If you decide to do the door panels you only need to cover about half for full effect; we covered it all prior to reading that cost saving recommendation.
This is correct.

Do NOT waste hundreds buying too much dynamat, that is not the intent of the product, it will not work, and it can cause problems with maintenance and repairs to put large sheets of the stuff where it doesn't belong, and potentially trap water and lead to rust.

Dynamat and other butyl dampeners are for reducing vibration and resonance noise in the metal parts of your car. It is a small part of noise reduction and the factory already applies this to many areas. If you are going to instll a butyl dampener like dynamat, you only need about 25% coverage of any metal surface, using small pieces, and only on surfaces that are not rigid like outer and inner door panels, large floor or roof panels that don't already have factory dampener, etc. Using much more than 25% coverage makes almost zero difference, but is popular because the manufacturers do nothing to dispel the myth and customer think more is better. Independent testing verfies how little you need. I suggest secondskinaudio over dynamat; It is similarly priced but goes further and is a better product due to its foil thickness and weight. They also sell MLV and foams appropriate for car evironment. Their MLV is over priced and you can find the same for cheaper elsewhere.

As mentioned by Devers, mass loaded vinyl MLV will reduce many frequencies well as it is heavy and absorbs sound energy. It must be decoupled from metal panels by at least 1/8th inch of something soft like a closed cell foam so it is not bonded to the metal and won't resonate. Carpet works, and this is why doing most of the floor under the floor mats through out the car can reduce noise. I hung a sheet of MLV in each door panel and got the most noise reduction from all the treatment in my project. Adding more to the floors helped significantly also, especially draped over the entire cargo area and under the rear seat and front mats. Make sure you buy virgin MLV to avoid getting recycled material that will smell and release VOCs into your cabin.

In pillars, door cavities, and roof you can use melamine foam to absorb high frequencies that bounce around those spaces or enter from them. All foam installed MUST be the type that will not hold water (closed cell foam for decoupling MLV and hydrophobic open cell melamine foam for cavities and large metal panels to absorb high frequencies).

Unplugging the ANC active noise cancellation under the dash also unplugs the idiotic fake exhaust sounds your car plays in the cabin. Yes, really. So emberrassing for Honda and the other major brands who do this. The ANC module does very little if anything at all to reduce road noise, and once the sound is gone you realize how annoying it was.

I have been much happier since treating my Passport for noise. Some may say too much labor, I say it was one weekend for years of greater peace for each mile driven. With quiet 18" tires it rivals some luxury cars. Total cost of the sound deadening project was about $600-700 and a couple long days in the garage.

I would advise if this is something you want, do some research in to the proper materials and installation first. Just slapping in products is a way to use a lot of money for little to no effect and may even cause issues you have not considered.

I would post pictures of the project if I can find the audio thread I put them in....
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Just finished covering four doors with 80 mil Mat 66s and 150 mil Noico Reds—it made a night and day difference! Bass is more pronounced, and even though road noise wasn't something I paid much attention to before, it's just a better overall experience. This whole thing started because I was only looking to vinyl wrap my handlebars. Since the doors were already stripped, I threw in some mats, which was about 90 dollars worth for two different sets, and now I can say it was 100% worth it.

*If anyone does this, I recommend using a legit roller because it took hours to roll the mats out with the back of a screwdriver.
Here are some bad pics:

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Knock test:
 

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I've said this before, even if you are not upgrading your stereo, sound deadening the doors makes a HUGE difference.

Thank you for confirming this...!(y)
 
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I've said this before, even if you are not upgrading your stereo, sound deadening the doors makes a HUGE difference.

Thank you for confirming this...!(y)
Well that's good and all, but the important question is how does it work on mother-in-laws????? 😆

In all fairness we have a very good relationship. In fact more than once she had told me she worships the quicksand I walk on. 🤣
 

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Well that's good and all, but the important question is how does it work on mother-in-laws????? 😆

In all fairness we have a very good relationship. In fact more than once she had told me she worships the quicksand I walk on. 🤣
100% effective when used as directed by the mfg:
 
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100% effective when used as directed by the mfg:
Looking for a solution that has a longer operational life than 20 hours. She comes for 7 days at least. :ROFLMAO:
 

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I will be adding sound deadening to my doors in the next week or two (I have the materials, just need to make the time). @tombox, it looks like you did a great job! I followed your method of lining the inside of the door panels in my last car and it worked well. I see a lot of sites using the material on the inner part of the door, thus replacing the vapor guard or white blanket that is currently on my doors. Did you reattach the white blanket to the door? If so, how did your reattach it? Mine looks like it's glued on.

Thanks in advance for the help, this forum is very helpful for us new Passport owners.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
I will be adding sound deadening to my doors in the next week or two (I have the materials, just need to make the time). @tombox, it looks like you did a great job! I followed your method of lining the inside of the door panels in my last car and it worked well. I see a lot of sites using the material on the inner part of the door, thus replacing the vapor guard or white blanket that is currently on my doors. Did you reattach the white blanket to the door? If so, how did your reattach it? Mine looks like it's glued on.

Thanks in advance for the help, this forum is very helpful for us new Passport owners.
Thanks. I just sliced it open with a razer and attached it back on. It sticks back to itself without a problem. I pulled what I can until I hit a snag. That's when I used the razer to make small cuts (about 50% left on the vehicle and 50% left on the white vapor barrier). I then pulled little by little, trying to not to force it as much as possible. It's pretty easy. You can do it.
 

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I will just keep repeating this in hopes of saving someone time and money, but there is NO significant difference in NOISE REDUCTION using butyl dampener materials "mats" after you reach 25-35% coverage, single layer. After that you are wasting money and time for miniscule gains, and also risking messing up inner panels with moisture or repairability issues. Plastering a sheet (or multiple layers) on every square inch is no better than 25-35% coverage. This has been measured many times. One of the best sites for this info unfortunately closed down (sounddeadenershowdown, a company whose entire business was quieting car interiors the best way possible, and selling materials so that others could DIY). Most of the butyl "mat" manufacturers encourage you to buy more and most people think more is better, but butyl dampener is just there to lower the resonant frequency of panels below audible spectrum. Low and mid frequency sound goes right through it- its just a few tens of mils of butyl and foil. Sure, if you add a ton of the stuff it eventually is enough mass to block sound, but price per weight that is a huge waste of money, and also the stuff can cause a lot of problems if not installed perfectly.

Mass loaded vinyl with a thin layer of closed cell foam decoupling is the proper tool to BLOCK noise (the much heavier and loosely suspended mass absorbs the sound energy and converts it to tiny amounts of heat). MLV is used in between double drywall in many studios for the same purpose.

To absorb mid and high frequency noise, fill cavities (like above roof headliner, pillars, etc with lots of air with hydrophobic open cell foams like melamine.
 

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Thank you for the insights, guys. I went ahead and covered a portion of the doors with Dynamat and it's made a positive difference. I don't think I'll be going further that what I've done in the doors at this point. I was able to detach and re-attach the white vapor barrier without too much trouble so the job wasn't that difficult. Thank you again, guys, I'm loving the Passport and now loving the stereo with the new speakers and sound deadening.
 
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