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Picked up my Passport in late February and it came with the stock Continentals. Curious how they will be in the snow. I live in sometimes snowy New England. Although this winter we’ve seen very little snow. None since I’ve owned it. I am interested to hear what drivers are using for tires in snowy climates. Do most drivers use all season or switch over to snow tires? I do go skiing so driving in the snow is on mostly highways, snow covered side roads and parking lots.
 

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I have 17" snow tires and its a freaking tank! Alot of my driving done on unplowed backroads at night. I cant answer your question but by the looks of the stock tires I wouldnt drive on them in winter
 

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2020 Passport Elite - Modern Steel Metallic w/Black Leather
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I’ve been using all season continentals for the last 12 years on 2005 Pilot in the northeast and they work quite well in the snow. Plus, lots of tread life. The first set, I got about 65,000 on them, the second about the same, and I’m on the third set now. I forget what the Pilot came with when it was new.
 

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I live in the Boston area and make frequent ski trips to Vermont. I bought a set of used 18" Pilot wheels and I'm running Nokian Hakka R3 SUV winter tires on our Passport.
Amazing traction in really difficult conditions. Excellent braking and turning as well.

If you want one year-round all-season tire, go with a Nokian WRG4 on 18" Ridgeline wheels.
 

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Before investing in snow tires, even with living in the northeast, evaluate if you really have a need for a winter snow tire or if a really quality all season would work. If you're living in Canada like qwikz, well you may not see real solid ground until April/May and then only for 3 or 4 months. Winter tires are pretty much a must.

40 years ago I needed snow tires, but 40 years ago we had more and heavier annual snows here in the midwest. Add to that, that 40 years ago you basically had summer tires and winter tires and neither were no where near as good as todays modern tires.

Back then to get even better traction the snow tires were often studded tires. Some states no longer allow studded tires and many states regulate the time period you can put them on. I can't remember the last time I saw someone with studded tires on a vehicle .

Depending on where you live, urban or rural, the amount of snow, ice, slush that you typically encounter and the kinds of roads you typically take a set of top quality all season tires my work for you or they may not.
 

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Here's why I dont think the stock tires wouldnt work for me in winter lol
This is from our snow fall last Thursday when I got home from work.
Like I said in my previous post, this thing is a beast in the snow,I can still do 80-100kph (65mph) without any issues,stable as a rock! I always use dedicated snow tires in winter, even on my big 4x4 pick up trucks.
 

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Your use of a double negative leaves me wondering what you meant ...

"Here's why I dont think the stock tires wouldnt work for me in winter"
 

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How often you drive through snow determines if you need winter tires. For me, I drive to Vermont to ski each week and about half of those trips include driving on snow, ice or slush. For example, last Thursday night it was 20 degrees and snowing hard. The right lane on I-89 had 2 melted tire tracks and many vehicles were content to maintain 30 mph on these 2 tracks. Many of us with AWD and winter tires were able to drive on the packed left lane snow at 60 mph with no issues. Winter tires make sense for me since I want to travel safely and not turn a normal 4 hour trip into an 8 hour trip,
 

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You are less likely to complain about driving but stopping will be way better using snow tires. Stopping is pretty much the only reason I buy dedicated snow ties. You stop much better on snow and especially on ice. Having more aggressive tread helps with driving in heavy rain as well, which we get a lot in WA but stock tires are doing OK with the rain. If you have room to store extra tires, the peace of mind when it comes to stopping is worth it for me. I have had Blizzaks on my last three cars (2 Outbacks and a Pilot).
 

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I am running with 18 rims with winter tires and they have been awesome in the snow. I decided to buy them after my first experience with the stock tires in the snow - not pleasant. I specifically bought this vehicle to be able to handle any likely road condition I will find in the Midwest and upper Midwest. For me, it is worth the cost. I plan to run the winter tires from Nov to March and then switch to the stock rims and tires the rest of the year. Best of luck!
 

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Your use of a double negative leaves me wondering what you meant ...

"Here's why I dont think the stock tires wouldnt work for me in winter"
What dont you understand? Stock tires wont work for me in the climate we have here in winter. AKA there garbage in snow and ice.
 

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What dont you understand? Stock tires wont work for me in the climate we have here in winter. AKA there garbage in snow and ice.
You used a double negative - which indicates you believe the stock tires would work for you; this was contrary to what I thought you were implying.
You've now clarified it as they WON'T work for you. My winter driving environment includes a trace of snow once every 10-15 years. I just stay home.

Another southern Redneck suggestion, from your above sentence:
"AKA there garbage in snow and ice." I suggest you use they are garbage (or they're garbage); and don't for dont.
Just yanking your grammar chain ...
 

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Isn't that the law were you live. 5 flakes of snow or more and the state shuts down?
That only applies to areas north of Montgomery; do keep in mind we have No snow removal equipment down here.

True story, about 6 years ago I was in a local (RIP) gun shop - parked outside was an old rust eaten Chev? with a snowplow on it. Thats the only one I've ever seen in my area.
 

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Oh I believe you. Not one shred of snow removal equipment, but enough plywood to board up windows for three Hurricanes.

You sure it was for snow. We use such things up here for spreading and smoothing the gravel in driveways as well as snow.
 

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whens spring?
 

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nope a little pic from beginning of the year
but I didnt find mine on the internet
 

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Discussion Starter #20
Picked up my Passport in late February and it came with the stock Continentals. Curious how they will be in the snow. I live in sometimes snowy New England. Although this winter we’ve seen very little snow. None since I’ve owned it. I am interested to hear what drivers are using for tires in snowy climates. Do most drivers use all season or switch over to snow tires? I do go skiing so driving in the snow is on mostly highways, snow covered side roads and parking lots.
Is there a reason for using 18” wheels for snow tires?? I used the NOKIANS before, great tires.
 
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