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Discussion Starter #1
I am adding OEM hitch/harness/trans cooler. Looking at camper just over 3000lbs dry weight. Probably 4500lbs loaded. Wonder how Passport will handle. Anyone towing something similar ?
 

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This question has frequently come up before - so do some research; but in a nutshell:

First, check your trailer specs - that sounds like alot of cargo weight for a 3000 pound camper (Never Exceed your trailers allowable gross weight).

Second, as long as you load it carefully (tongue weight of 10% (minimum) -15% (maximum) of total trailer weight an AWD Passport will handle 5K loaded pounds / non-AWD PP max out at 3500 pounds loaded. This 10-15 percent weight distribution is to ensure trailer tracking / stability.

AND don't forget - you WILL need a wired trailer brake controller (assuming you wish to make an emergency stop).

Pics of your PP and camper should soon follow.
 

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This question has frequently come up before - so do some research; but in a nutshell:

First, check your trailer specs - that sounds like alot of cargo weight for a 3000 pound camper (Never Exceed your trailers allowable gross weight).

Second, as long as you load it carefully (tongue weight of 10% (minimum) -15% (maximum) of total trailer weight an AWD Passport will handle 5K loaded pounds / non-AWD PP max out at 3500 pounds loaded. This 10-15 percent weight distribution is to ensure trailer tracking / stability.

AND don't forget - you WILL need a wired trailer brake controller (assuming you wish to make an emergency stop).

Pics of your PP and camper should soon follow.
Hondas pre wired for a brake controller, plug and play under the dash and with the added Fuzes....
 

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Pre-wired under the dash but you need to run a separate harness to the bumper to use it.
 

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Hondas pre wired for a brake controller, plug and play under the dash and with the added Fuzes....
Pre-wired under the dash but you need to run a separate harness to the bumper to use it.
6126

OEM Honda Passport trailer wiring kit includes Honda Part #06320-SZA-A001, which is the wiring pigtail for under dash connector, and the 20-A fuse for #3 position in engine compartment fuse box. This package only needs to be installed IF you are have trailer brakes, and requires purchase & installation of an AFTERMARKET trailer brake controller. This pigtail will connect your AFTERMARKET controller to the pre-wired Passport trailer-brake harness that is located under the dash. No additional or separate harness is required with Honda OEM trailer wiring kit.
 

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I just went through this and I too was surprised it was all there, but I didn't want the issues that came along with the cooler. My 3000 lb. trailer doesn't have brakes and I don't need the 5000 capacity for the trailer.... E Trailer has a 7 pin set up too and it works the same way as OEM
 

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I'm confused by several above comments:

First - it is my understanding that all trailers of 3000# are required to have trailer brakes on them. Some states require brakes on 2000 pound campers.

Second, in order to tow your Passport requires several pieces of equipment, most obviously the actual hitch and a matching ball (there are several size balls, depending on load.

In order to have braking you'll need a brake controller; this controller is attached with an additional cable (OEM or generic) under the dash of your car. Then an additional cable (with 4 pins = lights only, or 7 pins to add brakes) is necessary; this cable is wired under the car and is where you make the camper connection.

A tranny cooler is also usually recommended.
 

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I'm confused by several above comments:

First - it is my understanding that all trailers of 3000# are required to have trailer brakes on them. Some states require brakes on 2000 pound campers.
Rules regarding trailer brakes vary by state, example:
Alabama Trailer Brake Laws (Wrascal) Independent braking system required over 3,000 lbs.
Oregon Trailer Brake Laws (My state) Independent braking system not required, but combination of vehicles must be able to stop within legal limits. Every motor vehicle and combination of motor vehicles, except motorcycles and mopeds, shall at all times be equipped with a parking brake system.
Illinois Trailer Brake Laws (Passport_It_is) Every trailer or semitrailer of a gross weight of over 3,000 lbs. must be equipped with brakes when operated upon a highway. Such brakes must be so designed and connected that in case of an accidental breakaway of a towed vehicle over 5,000 lbs., the brakes are automatically applied.
California Trailer Brake Laws (Mods) Trailer brakes are optional, as coming to a complete stop at stop signs is considered Faux pas, and you will be rear-ended. Likewise, turn signals should never be used, or you will never be able to merge. If you do use your turn signals, make sure you leave them on for several miles, because it provides sufficient warning to other drivers of your intent to eventually complete a multi-lane 'California Cut'. Towing requires a safe distance between you and the vehicle in front of you, but never leave more than 10 feet or someone will cut in front of you. The faster you drive through a red light with your trailer the less change you have of getting hit. Always brake heavily and slow to a crawl when you observe anything on the side of the road, such as an accident or someone changing a tire, as doing so is a sign of respect for the victim. Avoid driving in the right lane when the left lane is available, so cars behind you can test their high beam lights by flashing them behind you. When stopped at a traffic light when towing a heavy trailer, always heavy honk your horn at cars in front of you if they do not move within 2 milliseconds after light turns green. When towing in heavy traffic, always enter intersection on yellow/red light, as it is safer to block entire intersection than wait for next green light. Every California trailer owner is required to pledge to stop using their fossil fuel vehicles within 5 years, and convert to bicycles.

You can verify your basic trailer towing laws here, by state



In order to have braking you'll need a brake controller; this controller is attached with an additional cable (OEM or generic) under the dash of your car. Then an additional cable (with 4 pins = lights only, or 7 pins to add brakes) is necessary; this cable is wired under the car and is where you make the camper connection.
A portion of this trailer wiring is pre-installed in all trim levels of the 2019/2020 Honda Passport.
Pre-wiring includes:
(A) Engine compartment fuse box to under-dash electrical panel, with attached connector;
(B) Under-dash panel to rear connector, located behind the driver's side rear cargo panel.

Honda Trailer Wiring Harness #08L91-TGS-100 includes wiring harness that attaches to this rear connector located behind cargo panel, exits the cargo area and attaches to bracket on hitch, terminating with 7-blade connector. IF installing OEM Honda wiring kit, no additional cable is required, under the vehicle or otherwise.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Just to make sure I understand all this ... if I get :


I dont need anything else for electronic brakes to work . Is this correct ?
 

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Just to make sure I understand all this ... if I get :


I dont need anything else for electronic brakes to work . Is this correct ?
You make it difficult for us ... asking us what you need when we don't know what you have.

Do you have a brake controller?
Is it wired in to the car (under dash connection)?
The above mentioned hitch harness will carry the signals (generated by the brake controller) to the trailer/ camper - brakes + lights.

Do you have an installed hitch?
Do you have the proper sized ball? Is the ball mounted at the correct height or must it be adjusted up/ down? If incorrect you'll need an adaptor to move the ball in to proper position.

Does your camper/ trailer have elec. brakes? Do you know its actual allowable gross weight?
 

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Just to make sure I understand all this ... if I get :


I dont need anything else for electronic brakes to work . Is this correct ?
↑↑ Agree with Wrascal ↑↑

First assumption is you have all the towing hard-points in place:
Properly rated and correctly installed hitch;
Properly rated receiver and ball, including weight-distributing unit as required or prudent;
Properly installed and tested wiring kit;
Properly functioning electric brakes on the trailer;
And you purchase and install an AFTERMARKET TRAILER BRAKE CONTROLLER (<-- click on link to learn more)

Just as you use use your leg to control pressure on the brake pedal in your Passport, your trailer brakes require a device to control the duration and amount of force to apply to the electric brakes. A Trailer Brake Controller performs that function . . . many different styles available (Honda does not market one), so research carefully. It is typically installed in an easily accessible area on lower dash fascia, and slices to the 06320-SZA-A001 listed in earlier post.

Example of Brake Controllers installed, here pictured in late model Honda Ridgelines (since Ridgeline owners tend to tow more frequently than Passport/Pilot owners):
6128


If you desire a 'factory' look, all you need is some imagination and fabrication skills:
6129
 

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Exterior to the car:

Two other items I believe to be very important is a TPMS system for the camper tires (I trust the TST-507 system - google it),
and an Electrical management system/ EMS (NOT A CHEAP SURGE PROTECTOR). I like those from Progressive Industries - another google exercise.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
I dont have anything yet but stocked EXL. Trying to figure out what I need so when I buy camper I dont burn up the brakes. I ordered OEM hitch and wiring harness. Good chance I will need electronic brakes so I rather plan for it now . I am pretty sure (based on what I am seeing as good fit) the camper will be over 3000 dry weight.

Sounds as at min I will at least need brake controller.

I do know that I will need to install the additional trans cooler. I can do this anytime before I would get camper which is still 3-4 month away at min.

thanks
 

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Exterior to the car:

Two other items I believe to be very important is a TPMS system for the camper tires (I trust the TST-507 system - google it),
and an Electrical management system/ EMS (NOT A CHEAP SURGE PROTECTOR). I like those from Progressive Industries - another google exercise.
From what I gather you never towed a thing in your life but you are making a lot of statements like the proper size ball ? well your trail receiver has it marked my 3000# trailer I built has a 2" ball the bolt size determines the weight it can pull and is way over kill and no brakes because it is not required here and it doesn't require inspection. My campers had a bigger ball 2 5/16 and was a tandem with brakes. Surge brakes are a pain you have to back up without putting the pin in them.
E-Trailer sells the 7 pin set up that is plug and play also and I would bet the same company makes them for Honda. IT will charge the battery on the trailer, wires for lights and wire for electric brakes. Very simple, your brakes on the tow vehicle are hydraulic and campers are electric the controller limits the amount of volts going back to the trailer brakes so not to lock them up so it kind of ramps up the harder you push the brake pedal.
 

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Ok, I stand corrected, So you have a 5th wheel , that is the way to go rather than a receiver hitch as long as you don't need the bed for anything
 

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Like this conversation questions, I started small and light.

Bumper pulls: Several utility trailers over 35-40 years.
Late 70s, a small crank up camper pulled with a Buick Regal.
Later a 24' / 5000# (loaded) HiLo - first pulled with a Ford E350 van - then a Ridgeline (discoverd my Weight Dist. Hitch wasn't necessary).

F250 with a 2008 32' 10K Jayco fifth.
F350 with a 2018 42' 16K Bighorn.

Surge brakes are useful on things like a boat trailer (where they're often submerged in water).
Regardless of law requirements trailer brakes are very desirable (hydralic discs will be overkill on these scampers).
Trailer hitch balls come in 3 sizes, it must be matched to your trailer / and carry the load level.
 
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