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2023 PP Elite Sonic Gray Pearl
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It would be interesting to see 40MPG without hybridization for crossover.

TBH, 40MPG for sedans should be the norm.
FWIW I had a 2017 Accord Hybrid before the Passport and I loved it. 48 MPG in the summer (the heater running dropped it down to 43 MPG) and plenty of giddyup.
 

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Well, had oil change, tire rotation and rear diff. Serviced today. Came to pick it up and ask did they perform software update for start/stop. They said no but they would do it if i wanted to wait for about an hour, smdh! So here i sit waiting for them to perform update🙄 $270 for above service incase someone is wondering.
Software update for start/stop? I don't think I heard anything about this software update; how did u find out about it? thanks
 

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2019 Passport EXL
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10 Posts
Well, had oil change, tire rotation and rear diff. Serviced today. Came to pick it up and ask did they perform software update for start/stop. They said no but they would do it if i wanted to wait for about an hour, smdh!
So here i sit waiting for them to perform update🙄
$270 for above service incase someone is wondering.
:mad::eek::eek::oops:
 

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2022 Trailsport
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219 Posts
Last week dealer quoted me $295.00 for B16 service (Oil, Filter, Rear Diff) WITHOUT Tire Rotation, which I do myself. My local (trustworthy) shop completed the same service for $165.00. Dealers, Ugh.
B16 also includes checking all fluids, inspecting chassis, steering, suspension, adjusting parking brakes, removing calipers, inspecting and noting brake pad/rotor wear, cleaning and lubricating the slider pins and boots. Even at a flat rate of 2 hrs labor that is not a bad deal. That's why tire rotation is part of the service.

Even with a lift it takes a better part of 1.5 hrs to perform.
 

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B16 also includes checking all fluids, inspecting chassis, steering, suspension, adjusting parking brakes, removing calipers, inspecting and noting brake pad/rotor wear, cleaning and lubricating the slider pins and boots. Even at a flat rate of 2 hrs labor that is not a bad deal. That's why tire rotation is part of the service.

Even with a lift it takes a better part of 1.5 hrs to perform.
Oh I forgot we are driving a Ferrari.
Unless the customers complain, dealers are not gonna perform these additional checkups that require disassembling. Maybe just note the thickness of the pads and that’s it.
 

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2021 AWD Sport Crystal Black / 2021 AWD EX-L lSteel Metallic
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640 Posts
Discussion Starter · #29 ·
Software update for start/stop? I don't think I heard anything about this software update; how did u find out about it? thanks
Actually found out about this update on this forum. Then ask dealer about it while i was there. They did perform this update free of charge.
 

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2022 Trailsport
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219 Posts
Unless the customers complain, dealers are not gonna perform these additional checkups that require disassembling.
It's part of the service and they are required to do it. I have yet to see a dealership take shortcuts on a safety item such as brakes. Chassis, steering, brake, caliper inspection and slider pin lubrication is to be done at every tire rotation. I don't know anyone in their right mind who would neglect doing so. It is part of simple maintenance procedures that are followed by virtually every legitimate repair facility.
 
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It's part of the service and they are required to do it. I have yet to see a dealership take shortcuts on a safety item such as brakes. Chassis, steering, brake, caliper inspection and slider pin lubrication is to be done at every tire rotation. I don't know anyone in their right mind who would neglect doing so. It is part of simple maintenance procedures that are followed by virtually every legitimate repair facility.
I have never seen slider pins on brake calipers done at every tire rotation ever. Where are you getting these information or it’s one of those thing you do?
Slider pins are done when I get new pads put in with all the needed lubrication needed when putting new pads on.
It’s not 1950’s anymore.
 

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I have never seen slider pins on brake calipers done at every tire rotation ever. Where are you getting these information or it’s one of those thing you do?
Slider pins are done when I get new pads put in with all the needed lubrication needed when putting new pads on.
It’s not 1950’s anymore.
I haven't heard of doing this either though I wouldn't be against doing this. The labor involved to do the sliders pins is not insignificant since it is only a few steps away from a full brake pad replacement so I doubt a majority of dealers perform such as part of the B maintenance service. What I've seen is simply the good ol' measure the brake pads with a measuring stick or eyeball it when I go to a dealer.
 

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I haven't heard of doing this either though I wouldn't be against doing this. The labor involved to do the sliders pins is not insignificant since it is only a few steps away from a full brake pad replacement so I doubt a majority of dealers perform such as part of the B maintenance service. What I've seen is simply the good ol' measure the brake pads with a measuring stick or eyeball it when I go to a dealer.
Pretty much. There are signs if one of the pins get stuck such as uneven wear on the pads and stuff.
 

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Wow! How did they come up with $270 for that? Care to share the itemization? I'd ask for a loaner car at that point.
The elf blood tyranny fluid is over $20/qt. I just did all of the above to mine & material was almost $200. I did get enough tyranny fluid for 2 jobs. Not hard, the tyranny change was about as fast as the oil change. Jacking it up & doing the rotation is worth going to a shop. Luckily a friend owns a tire shop, so I have lift access.
 

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The elf blood tyranny fluid is over $20/qt. I just did all of the above to mine & material was almost $200. I did get enough tyranny fluid for 2 jobs. Not hard, the tyranny change was about as fast as the oil change. Jacking it up & doing the rotation is worth going to a shop. Luckily a friend owns a tire shop, so I have lift access.
I use the spare for rotation probably takes me 30 minutes to complete.
 

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2022 Trailsport
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219 Posts
Here is a documented 6K service (per service manual) I completed myself. Yes It's my motorcycle but it's no different than what I would do to my 4 wheeled vehicle at the required service intervals.

The only 2 things I did outside the parameters of servicing was replaced spark plugs (service requirement is to pull and inspect) and opened the fuel reference screw on throttle body to get rid of the factory lean bog off idle. Everything else is by the book.

6K service 06/24/20 5578 miles:
Rear brakes disassemble, measure, inspect, clean, lube sliders
Outside pad upper 4.53mm
Inside pad 4.45mm
Rear pad wear limit .8mm
Rotor thickness 4.97mm
Rear rotor wear limit 4.5mm
Rear rotor runout limit .15mm
Front brakes disassemble, measure, inspect, clean, smooth out pin
RF outside pad 4.43mm
RF inside pad 4.30mm
LF outside pad 4.47mm
LF inside pad 4.30mm
RF outside pad 4.43mm
RF inside pad 4.30mm
Front pad wear limit .5mm
Left rotor 4.46mm
Right rotor 4.43mm
Front rotor wear limit 4mm
Front rotor runout limit .10mm
All pad measurements taken from middle of pad
Spark plug replacement
Air filter replacement
Check coils ohm rating:
#1 primary 1.5-1.6, secondary 9.94
#2 primary 1.5-1.6, secondary 9.90
#3 primary 1.5-1.6, secondary 9.98
#4 primary 1.5-1.6, secondary 9.76
Primary range spec: 1.19-1.61 ohms
Secondary range spec 8.5-11.5 ohms
Mount/balance/check spokes new Michelin Road 5 tires
Inspect, clean/lubricate hub sleeves and rear gear
Pull pumpkin, inspect, clean/lube splines and gears
Replace diff oil
Inspect steering head bearings
Inspect fork bushings (right one has a small amount of play)
Install wheels front and rear
Synchronize throttle bodies (open right reference to 3/4 turn)
Check throttle free play (no free play per my preference)
Lubricate, kick/center stands, shifter/rear brake shafts, clutch/brake lever pivot pins



Whenever I have my tires rotated (during fluid change) my local mechanic pulls the calipers, inspects and measures pads/rotors and lubes the pins. It's all part of the facilities inspection/service procedure.

It's a AAA approved facility and I have established a relationship with the owner over the years. In return of stellar service I bring a clean vehicle and detailed work order on what needs to be performed.

Bottom line is the B16 is going to be done and done right. The service manager knows right away I'm no one to trifle with. I'm polite but firm. My first B service is free and the dealership will do every single item on the list.
 

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Here is a documented 6K service (per service manual) I completed myself. Yes It's my motorcycle but it's no different than what I would do to my 4 wheeled vehicle at the required service intervals.

The only 2 things I did outside the parameters of servicing was replaced spark plugs (service requirement is to pull and inspect) and opened the fuel reference screw on throttle body to get rid of the factory lean bog off idle. Everything else is by the book.

6K service 06/24/20 5578 miles:
Rear brakes disassemble, measure, inspect, clean, lube sliders
Outside pad upper 4.53mm
Inside pad 4.45mm
Rear pad wear limit .8mm
Rotor thickness 4.97mm
Rear rotor wear limit 4.5mm
Rear rotor runout limit .15mm
Front brakes disassemble, measure, inspect, clean, smooth out pin
RF outside pad 4.43mm
RF inside pad 4.30mm
LF outside pad 4.47mm
LF inside pad 4.30mm
RF outside pad 4.43mm
RF inside pad 4.30mm
Front pad wear limit .5mm
Left rotor 4.46mm
Right rotor 4.43mm
Front rotor wear limit 4mm
Front rotor runout limit .10mm
All pad measurements taken from middle of pad
Spark plug replacement
Air filter replacement
Check coils ohm rating:
#1 primary 1.5-1.6, secondary 9.94
#2 primary 1.5-1.6, secondary 9.90
#3 primary 1.5-1.6, secondary 9.98
#4 primary 1.5-1.6, secondary 9.76
Primary range spec: 1.19-1.61 ohms
Secondary range spec 8.5-11.5 ohms
Mount/balance/check spokes new Michelin Road 5 tires
Inspect, clean/lubricate hub sleeves and rear gear
Pull pumpkin, inspect, clean/lube splines and gears
Replace diff oil
Inspect steering head bearings
Inspect fork bushings (right one has a small amount of play)
Install wheels front and rear
Synchronize throttle bodies (open right reference to 3/4 turn)
Check throttle free play (no free play per my preference)
Lubricate, kick/center stands, shifter/rear brake shafts, clutch/brake lever pivot pins



Whenever I have my tires rotated (during fluid change) my local mechanic pulls the calipers, inspects and measures pads/rotors and lubes the pins. It's all part of the facilities inspection/service procedure.

It's a AAA approved facility and I have established a relationship with the owner over the years. In return of stellar service I bring a clean vehicle and detailed work order on what needs to be performed.

Bottom line is the B16 is going to be done and done right. The service manager knows right away I'm no one to trifle with. I'm polite but firm. My first B service is free and the dealership will do every single item on the list.
From my experience, dealers don’t care when I trade in my vehicles. I always maintain my vehicles myself so there is never a record on carfax and dealers don’t care.
 

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2022 Trailsport
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219 Posts
From my experience, dealers don’t care when I trade in my vehicles. I always maintain my vehicles myself so there is never a record on carfax and dealers don’t care.
That's cool. I have never traded in a vehicle before. I always sold private party or consignment. I do everything humanly possible to prevent a breakdown or DNF when I was racing.

I have heard horror stories of dealerships who take advantage of customers and it's horrible. When I pay for a service I expect nothing less than perfect. I have been fortunate to deal with great dealerships and repair facilities over the years.
 

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2022 Trailsport
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219 Posts
Only perfectionists can expect others to be perfect.
That is an unrealistic expectation.
When you are paying for a service then yes it needs to be done right. I'm a lot more lenient when I'm performing a task for myself. I'm far from a perfectionist.
 
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