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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So, I’m thinking about replacing my beloved 2017 V6 Accord Touring with a more versatile vehicle, either a Ridgeline or an SUV (Passport/RAV4/Outback). I can’t decide which type of vehicle would be the best all-around from a daily-driven standpoint. I think the Passport is a better fit for the majority of my daily driving and hauling duties and the more desirable overall, but there are a few issues when the less frequent tasks come up. Namely, hauling 4x8 material, landscaping supplies, taking construction debris and other items to the dump, and moving the occasional larger piece of furniture or similar bulky item. With a Passport, these tasks would most likely require a trailer. I’m not opposed to purchasing a nice aluminum trailer eventually, but my small property doesn’t lend itself to storing said trailer anywhere super desirable. I could store it at my dad’s place, a 20-minute drive away, though. The 5,000lbs max towing of the Ridgeline or the Passport would be more than enough for my needs. The other SUVs on my list tow considerably less. The RAV4 Adventure can tow up to 3,500lbs, Gas Limited - 1,500lbs, and Hybrid Limited - 1,750lbs. The 2020 Outback 2.5 XT models can tow 3,500lbs. So a RAV4 or Outback could suitably tow an appropriately-sized trailer for my needs.

As for the Ridgeline as my sole vehicle, I’m a little concerned that not having that SUV convenience would bother me on a day-to-day basis. The narrow rear door opening would probably bother me a bit. I know the door checks can be swapped to enhance the opening, but still a bit tight if you’re in and out often. For carrying the bike, the extra length of the Ridgeline would present a challenge. Yes, I can use my existing 1Up-USA hitch rack, but that would make it almost impossible to parallel park at the park I frequent. I could make a custom bar for the bed and attach a fork mount to secure the bike, but I’d rather haul the bike without removing the front wheel. It just seems like the Ridgeline would require several concessions on a daily basis for a significant advantage occasionally. Not sure this is rational thinking, just where my head is at right now.

Anyone been through a similar decision? How about anyone that has gone from an Accord or similar to an SUV/Truck?Just for the record, I'm NOT interested in any other trucks besides the Ridgeline.
 

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We had a 2013 Accord Touring. Traded it in for a 2015 Chevy Impala 2LTZ and traded that for a 2017 Nissan Maxima Platinum. Traded in that a few months ago for the Passport Elite. We also considered the Ridgeline. Simply put. We just liked the Passport over the Ridgeline. It fit our needs better and just overall liked it better. Take both for a spin and compare. I think you will come out liking the PP over the RL unless you are a truck guy.
 

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We traded in a 2018 Ridgeline for our 2019 Passport, and do not regret the decision! While I do (at times) miss the ridgeline for carrying some items, it really has not been an issue. For us, the Passport allows us to carry our woofers "inside" while also transporting 2 or 3 extra humans inside, something that we could not do with the Ridgeline - well, we could have asked the "extra" humans to secure themselves in the box, but that may not have gone over all that well . . . really, the biggest reason for not keeping the Ridgeline was it not having a downhill gear and we spend a lot of time heading up into the mountains and the return trip was never comfortable with the Ridgeline while heading downhill . . . other than that, the Ridgeline was fabulous, BUT, the Passport (with the 9-speed transmission allowing for full control heading down a logging road!) has proven to be much more versatile . . .
 

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Previously rig was a Tacoma, hated it. Went to Honda to check out the Ridgeline. Test drove it. While at the dealership we decided to test drive the Passport just because... We haven't looked back. The rear seat room was WAY better in the Passport than the Ridgeline. That was a huge factor for us.

Now, if you think you'll need a truck bed well, that's something only you can determine the true importance of it.

You're on a Passport forum so you'll get the nod to purchase a Passport... which is my vote. ;)
 
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The RAV4 also has that weenie sized under powered 4 cylinder in it. Very loud under heavy throttle as it struggles to deliver the power it needs. Many complaints about that. Toyota made a big mistake not putting a V6 in it.
 

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We had a 2017 Ridgeline for a year. We realized we really didn't need a pickup and decided we wanted to go back to a SUV. Traded the Ridgeline for a 2018 Chevy Equinox Premier 2.0 Turbo. After about 6 months I realized what a mistake it was. Traded it for a Passport last March. Took quite a loss on the Chevy (too be expected with a domestic brand vehicle). Very happy with the Passport. So much more interior storage room compared to the Ridgeline.
 

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We had a 2017 Ridgeline for a year. We realized we really didn't need a pickup and decided we wanted to go back to a SUV. Traded the Ridgeline for a 2018 Chevy Equinox Premier 2.0 Turbo. After about 6 months I realized what a mistake it was. Traded it for a Passport last March. Took quite a loss on the Chevy (too be expected with a domestic brand vehicle). Very happy with the Passport. So much more interior storage room compared to the Ridgeline.
Curious, why did you choose the Equinox to begin with? Price? Looks? What made you sour on it?
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
The rear seat passenger room in the Ridgeline would pretty much be a non-issue. Sometimes I take longer (5+ hours) trips with more than one passenger, but it's a 1-2 times per year kinda thing. Virtually every task that the Ridgeline would make easier versus the PP could be solved with a trailer, whether purchased or rented when needed. It think that small inconvenience 3-5 times per year would be worth it to have the PP, which at this point I think I'd rather drive every day. I would still consider some version of the RAV4, and the Outback, but the PP is up front more desirable simply because of the V6 and the extra cargo room.
 

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I was having the exact same thought about the Ridgeline .I have no need for a truck but really thought it might be nice ...anyone know if it is more expensive because I have my eye on a touring passport and where I live price is 53 with tax. , easy .And for the poster I. have spent a few days in the passport and sweet ride but seat comes up short I am rellay tall ...anyone else find that?.I cant seem to get any of the dealers to sell for less ? I haven't driven the Ridgeline .....Help too!
 

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So, I’m thinking about replacing my beloved 2017 V6 Accord Touring with a more versatile vehicle, either a Ridgeline or an SUV (Passport/RAV4/Outback). I can’t decide which type of vehicle would be the best all-around from a daily-driven standpoint. I think the Passport is a better fit for the majority of my daily driving and hauling duties and the more desirable overall, but there are a few issues when the less frequent tasks come up. Namely, hauling 4x8 material, landscaping supplies, taking construction debris and other items to the dump, and moving the occasional larger piece of furniture or similar bulky item. With a Passport, these tasks would most likely require a trailer. I’m not opposed to purchasing a nice aluminum trailer eventually, but my small property doesn’t lend itself to storing said trailer anywhere super desirable. I could store it at my dad’s place, a 20-minute drive away, though. The 5,000lbs max towing of the Ridgeline or the Passport would be more than enough for my needs. The other SUVs on my list tow considerably less. The RAV4 Adventure can tow up to 3,500lbs, Gas Limited - 1,500lbs, and Hybrid Limited - 1,750lbs. The 2020 Outback 2.5 XT models can tow 3,500lbs. So a RAV4 or Outback could suitably tow an appropriately-sized trailer for my needs.

As for the Ridgeline as my sole vehicle, I’m a little concerned that not having that SUV convenience would bother me on a day-to-day basis. The narrow rear door opening would probably bother me a bit. I know the door checks can be swapped to enhance the opening, but still a bit tight if you’re in and out often. For carrying the bike, the extra length of the Ridgeline would present a challenge. Yes, I can use my existing 1Up-USA hitch rack, but that would make it almost impossible to parallel park at the park I frequent. I could make a custom bar for the bed and attach a fork mount to secure the bike, but I’d rather haul the bike without removing the front wheel. It just seems like the Ridgeline would require several concessions on a daily basis for a significant advantage occasionally. Not sure this is rational thinking, just where my head is at right now.

Anyone been through a similar decision? How about anyone that has gone from an Accord or similar to an SUV/Truck?Just for the record, I'm NOT interested in any other trucks besides the Ridgeline.
Did you know the PP is actually slightly shorter than the Accord?
There are tilt-up small trailers available that are pretty inexpensive. Tilt up like a ping-pong table.
 

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I have one of each,,,2018 Ridgeline RTL-E and a 2019 Passport EX-L...Problem solved...The only negative for the Ridgeline is the back seat and door opening can be a little tight for a larger person...The Passport has larger rear doors and lots more room back there...I have read that the 2020 Ridgelines rear doors open further??? larryd
 

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My brother owned a 2017 Ridgeline and now has a 2020 Ridgeline. The back doors do open further, and the tailgate now locks. Perhaps Honda does monitor forums and listens to owner's suggestions.
 
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The back doors do open further, and the tailgate now locks. Perhaps Honda does monitor forums and listens to owner's suggestions.
Or a Honda pencil-pusher noted that Honda parts counters had very high volume of parts orders and over the counter sales of:
72340-TG7-A02 Right Door Check (which also works on Passport models)
72380-TG7-A02 Left Door Check (which also works on Passport models)

. . . and the requests for Honda service department to install aftermarket:
7460
 

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I installed the Pilot rear door checks on my PP which allowed the door to open about 5" more. Did it so a dog ramp would fit easier. Fido likes the rear seat, covered of course! There is also an indent close to the original open position so you do not always have to open the doors to the max.
 

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I installed the Pilot rear door checks on my PP which allowed the door to open about 5" more. Did it so a dog ramp would fit easier. Fido likes the rear seat, covered of course! There is also an indent close to the original open position so you do not always have to open the doors to the max.

Any pic's available?
 

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Ridgeline is a great truck but I found the back doors did not open wide enough to my liking. It also made putting a child’s car seat in the back somewhat difficult. We pulled the trigger on the PP because we like going shopping at antique malls, home improvement stores and Ikea all in one trip and the back is secured and away from outdoor elements.
 

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There is a simple DIY hack to open the doors wider and the issue has been resolved for the 2020's. I found the Ridgeline to be poorly built and even though is has the best rear seat room in it's class, no one in my family wants to sit in the back . Also, the headlights on anything other than the top of the line trims are terrible. The bed is a little short for my liking and I used the trunk only a handful of times. Loved the tailgate though, help saves your back when opening like a door. Awesome in snow/rain, always available traction. It's a niche vehicle though and in my mind difficult to justify over a full size. It really is a Pilot with a bed. It will always be that way unless Honda designs it from the ground up and that's not going to happen unless they partner with someone else (like GM perhaps, ha ha).
 
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