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I just got my 4 new aftermarket Ridgeline 18" wheels and 4 new Continental Terrain Contact AT 265/60/18 tires installed at a local mechanic who also performed a 4-wheel alignment of the vehicle. The alignment showed that both rear wheels had out of specification camber. He wanted to point that out to me before I installed the J-sport lift kit which is in shipment to me now. I called up the dealership where I purchased the vehicle and I emailed them as well and asked them how these out of specification cambers can be corrected. The service representative told me that this is common for many cars, not just Honda cars. I have less than 800 miles on this vehicle so I don't know how I feel about this assertion. Has anyone else encountered this situation? Does anyone else have a Passport with out of specification rear camber measurements? Does anyone believe that this is a common situation for all vehicles?
 

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I just got my 4 new aftermarket Ridgeline 18" wheels and 4 new Continental Terrain Contact AT 265/60/18 tires installed at a local mechanic who also performed a 4-wheel alignment of the vehicle. The alignment showed that both rear wheels had out of specification camber. He wanted to point that out to me before I installed the J-sport lift kit which is in shipment to me now. I called up the dealership where I purchased the vehicle and I emailed them as well and asked them how these out of specification cambers can be corrected. The service representative told me that this is common for many cars, not just Honda cars. I have less than 800 miles on this vehicle so I don't know how I feel about this assertion. Has anyone else encountered this situation? Does anyone else have a Passport with out of specification rear camber measurements? Does anyone believe that this is a common situation for all vehicles?
After my 2inch lift my rear tires were out of camber a touch. 0.5 positive. We are going to try to correct it tomorrow in the shop. Just a heads up before you install the lift it could increase the issue you currently have. I believe i saw talk of Traxda working on a longer lower rear control to solve this for lifts larger than 2in.
 

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It’s more common than you’d think. Someone in the assembly plant is supposed to operate the equipment to set the alignment, and there are supposed to be gages/checks to make sure it’s being done. I once bought a new GMC 4x4 and at 800 miles I noticed the tires were seriously wearing on the outside edges. The dealership tried to tell me that they were “in spec”. I asked “who’s spec”? We ended up in arbitration and for the seventh time I won. I got a new set of tires. I retired as a quality engineer and during my career I visited every assembly plant in N. America and Canada (that includes Mexico). The dedication to world class quality just isn’t in the American culture. When Japan turns over the plants to N. American management these things just start to pop up. I worked on a couple of joint ventures with one Asian manufacturer and I can tell you that they are totally anal about following processes and procedures. Not so domestically.
 

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The alignment showed that both rear wheels had out of specification camber. He wanted to point that out to me before I installed the J-sport lift kit which is in shipment to me now. I called up the dealership where I purchased the vehicle and I emailed them as well and asked them how these out of specification cambers can be corrected. The service representative told me that this is common for many cars, not just Honda cars. I have less than 800 miles on this vehicle so I don't know how I feel about this assertion.
How much out of spec? Did he give you a printout of what the rear camber OEM specs are, and what your vehicle is displaying? Alignment numbers can vary from one shop to another - remove vehicle from machine, drive 5 miles to a different shop, put it on their machine, and likely your results will be different, due to machine maintenance, age of equipment, up to date calibration, manufacturer of machine, and skill/experience of the tech.

Passport (OEM) has no adjustable arm for rear camber . . . but neither do most other vehicles. Lower rear control arm is stamped steel piece with simple bolt holes, but minute amount of adjustment likely possible by loosening and moving upper strut mount bolts, and loosening lower control arm bolts and forcing it to one side of the oversized bolt holes. May be able to get .1 or .2 degrees change at best. Otherwise, best scenerio would be take it to dealer and have them provide printout of your stock alignment vs Honda specs.

Good Luck
 

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Bumping this discussion. To answer the OP question, yes for me the rear is out of spec -- a lot. Left rear is -2.3 and as P-A-N-D-A wrote, there is no adjustment. My current wheel/tire set-up is 17" with 255/65-17. That's a 30.1" package compared to the OEM Elite package of 29.4". With no rear adjustment my 17" tires are cupping. I've been advised that the only way to correct this is with a rear camber kit or rotate the tires every 3,000 miles - they will still be cupping but more slowly. Either way, my 60,000 mile tires are shot at 30,000 miles.

Looking for a rear camber kit and haven't had any luck finding. If others know of any please post. Thanks.
 

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Are you having too much rear camber? It's pretty common to have 2 degrees of rear camber on passenger cars to allow understeer for safety.
However, if you are going to get lift kit, you will reduce the camber in the back to bring it down a bit.
Camber usually don't wear tires, it's the toe setting which scrubs the tires sideways.
Also, it's not uncommon for new cars to have slightly off alignment. I have had brand new car with an off center steering wheel. The factory workers don't get enough time to fine tune the alignment. They usually just make sure the toes are not off too crazy to cause premature tire wear.
 
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