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Nope. Nope.
 

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One claim is it stays in tires longer than just air. So if auto stays parked for awhile, tires won't deflate as fast. At times, my auto sits in my hot garage over a week or more. Nitrogen is/was in my wife's '13 Crosstour EX-L, new tires recently.
I just have"air" in my '15 Highlander tires. :rolleyes:
 

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Costco generally nitrogen fills and indicates with a green tire stem cap. Since our air is 78% nitrogen, I doubt the extra percentage is worth 2 cents to me.
 
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Nitrogen in the tire blocks the oxidation of the internal rubber. Nitrogen is a green alternative. As nitrogen-filled tires maintain proper pressure when ambient temps get colder achieving better gas mileage, reduced emissions and longer tire life.
 

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Nitrogen in the tire blocks the oxidation of the internal rubber. Nitrogen is a green alternative. As nitrogen-filled tires maintain proper pressure when ambient temps get colder achieving better gas mileage, reduced emissions and longer tire life.
Some where in the past there have been several cars and sets of tires. All the tires met their final end due to wear on the outside, never an issue with the internal rubber. All tires were filled with atmospheric air.

Has anyone considered "green"? A little research on the production of nitrogen will lead one to cryogenic air separation. The monthly electric bill for these production facilities are in the millions of $$, I spent a life time there. All electricity is not green or the construction/maintenance of said facility.

Then lets consider pressure. Tire and auto manufacturers take tire pressure into consideration. Bet most use air. Dig deeper into the calculations and we end up here; American Gas Association calculations. In industry where pipe line measurement are critical for payments of products, just use an AGA calc. Nitrogen is just like most other gasses, temperature/pressure compensation is required to measure how much is in a given space. The difference (pressure) between nitrogen vs air in the internal space of a tire is picking belly button lint.

Having been down this road before, I was once asked if the pressure in tires changed with the addition of weight in the vehicle. Several of the staff said "no". The test equipment was in one of my black boxes. The adapter was procured, test equipment connected to the valves on the tires and then staff members sat in said vehicle. The pressure increased as more staff members sat in the car. The load in the car will have a greater effect on tire pressure vs the gas inside the tire.

Save your money, purchase good whiskey;)

Stuck,
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Some where in the past there have been several cars and sets of tires. All the tires met their final end due to wear on the outside, never an issue with the internal rubber. All tires were filled with atmospheric air.

Has anyone considered "green"? A little research on the production of nitrogen will lead one to cryogenic air separation. The monthly electric bill for these production facilities are in the millions of $$, I spent a life time there. All electricity is not green or the construction/maintenance of said facility.

Then lets consider pressure. Tire and auto manufacturers take tire pressure into consideration. Bet most use air. Dig deeper into the calculations and we end up here; American Gas Association calculations. In industry where pipe line measurement are critical for payments of products, just use an AGA calc. Nitrogen is just like most other gasses, temperature/pressure compensation is required to measure how much is in a given space. The difference (pressure) between nitrogen vs air in the internal space of a tire is picking belly button lint.

Having been down this road before, I was once asked if the pressure in tires changed with the addition of weight in the vehicle. Several of the staff said "no". The test equipment was in one of my black boxes. The adapter was procured, test equipment connected to the valves on the tires and then staff members sat in said vehicle. The pressure increased as more staff members sat in the car. The load in the car will have a greater effect on tire pressure vs the gas inside the tire.

Save your money, purchase good whiskey;)

Stuck,
Thanks, Stuck for the technical run down. Your final advice is well taken.
 
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