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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I recently installed LED interior lights and LED back-up lights on my 2019 Honda Passport Elite. I purchase the two kits at Amazon, one for all the interior lights and one for the back-up lights. The 13 white interior LED light kit was just under $20.00 and the Back-up white (6000K) LED light kit was just under $15.00.

https://www.amazon.com/LEDpartsNow-...partsnow+honda+passport&qid=1610505340&sr=8-2

https://www.amazon.com/D15-Lighting...eywords=D15+led+lights&qid=1610505152&sr=8-22

Installation of the interior lights was under 30 minutes because I also did some measurements and the back-up lights were under 2 minutes. The interior lights come in several colors and since the ambient and dash lighting theme is white in the Passport, that is what I selected. I found the LEDs to be white with no blue tint and no yellow reflections from the substrate. Obviously trying to convey the color/temperature of the interior LED lights is hard because of the camera and the viewing monitor. So, if you enter your Passport the engine start button will flash an LED white ring and that is the white, I subjectively see these LEDs. Also last year I added the LED illuminated sill trim and they appear to be the same white [Photo1]. The LED back-up lights also seem to be about the same color.

The tools that I used are shown in a picture below [Photo 2]. The fuse puller was used to remove most of the lamps without using the tape trick (some lamps can be very hot). I tried using the trim removal tool that most have used but mine was a little too thick and did not work very well. So, I switched to the metal blade pry tool in the picture which worked great and I did not scratch anything. The third tool is a plastic wedge that popped out the visor fuse like lamps. The small flat blade screwdriver was used to pop off the visor plastic lenses. There is a small notch at the bottom of these lenses where the screwdriver can be inserted. If you are worried about scraping the lenses or surrounding area you could use painters’ tape, but I did not. All the interior LEDs are polarity sensitive in this kit and some are marked with a + and -. So just test and make sure they light up before re-installing the lens covers.



Row 1 in the picture [Photo 3] shows the five map/cargo LEDs. They are noticeably brighter than the stock lamps. They also dim when shutting off. The first and second row map lens can be pried off near the hinge points using the pry tool. The cargo light in the rear also pops off pretty easily using the pry tool. Row 2 are the four vanity LEDs. For me they were too bright head-on so I rotated them in slightly towards the mirror. Row 3, the first two are the smallest LEDs for the Glove compartment and the center console. I only replaced the center console and it was very easy to just pull out the round lamp bezel and then replace with the LED. The last two LEDs in Row 3 are for the front door courtesy lights and there are four tabs on the door lenses. I just used the pry tool at the top center of the lenses and popped them off. These LEDs are much brighter than the stock lamps and really light up the ground even for the back door area when it is open.

To replace the back-up lamps, you just turn the lamp holder 1/8 of a turn counter-clockwise and remove the socket and replace the 7440 lamps with the back-up LED lights [Photo 4]. The picture [Photo 5] doesn’t really show that the LEDs are much brighter than the incandescent 7440 bulbs.

The overall difference of the LEDs is great [Photo 6] and I think for the few minutes to install and the low price it is a really good modification. I liked the results so much I bought a second set of the interior LEDs as a backup the coming years. That way I do not have to worry about color matching and light output if one fails.



I made some tables [Photo 7] showing the voltage, current, and wattage of both the incandescent lamps and the LED replacements. Please note wattage (P) is the product of voltage (V) times the current (I). If you notice a slight disagreement with the equation P = V x I wattage it is because it was measured on my power supply [Photo 8 (back-up LED array) and Photo 9] and the current changes as the devices warms up. There is a huge savings in terms of power and heat so using the LEDs is a good way to go. For example, take a look at the tables showing the back-up lights. The original incandescent lamp is marked Japan 7440 12volt, 21 watts. The nominal voltage, engine off for the Passport is 12 volts and I measured 11.9 volts. However, most equipment operates when the engine is running. So, with the engine idling I measured 14.1 volts which is normal. An industry standard is set at 13.8 volts and that is the voltage I used for the tables. Therefore, the back-up lights are not 21 watts but more like 26 – 28 watts with the engine on. With the back-up LED lights you get more illumination using 3.81 watts of power then the incandescent lights using 26.3 watts! This lower wattage has the added bonus of keeping the lenses and enclosure cooler. As a side note some car systems may see the lower current as a fault and will not work properly or generate error indicators. The two kits I purchased have not had any fault or operational problems. As you know a main area that might be a problem is turn signal lights. Some problems are not blinking properly (rapid flashing) or generating error indicators. Unfortunately, the fix is adding a high wattage resistor in parallel to draw more current and fool the system. As an example, putting a 6-ohm resistor in parallel with an LED array will draw around 2 more amps, (12 v/6 ohms = 2 amps with engine off). Also, you now have a blinking light so there is a duty cycle that comes into play in determining the wattage of the components. At this time, I am not going to upgrade those lights to LEDs but maybe in the future.

Hope this was helpful and I am very happy with the upgrade.



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Wow, thanks for the details! I was just thinking of doing same updates, esp the rear backup lights. Are there any other lights on back end (brake, turn) that are not LED and can easily be replaced? Any downsides to doing so?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
On the Elite the turn signal lights are incandescent and the brake lights are LED. The rear turn signal lights are 21-watt amber bulbs. As mentioned in my post the replacement LEDs draw significantly less current and depending on the ones you purchase there can be problems. Some kits have a load built-in and some require an external resistor. There are kits with the resistors and connection leads available. If you do a search on this forum, there are suggestions and installation information. This is a personal option but many of these LED kits are much brighter than the stock system and I would prefer something that more closely matches the stock bulbs. I do have a measurement technique for determining the minimum current for the system to properly operate and maybe in the future I will do that procedure. As mentioned at this time I am not going to replace the front 28/8-watt amber and rear 21-watt amber turn signal lamps.
 

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I recently installed LED interior lights and LED back-up lights on my 2019 Honda Passport Elite. I purchase the two kits at Amazon, one for all the interior lights and one for the back-up lights. The 13 white interior LED light kit was just under $20.00 and the Back-up white (6000K) LED light kit was just under $15.00.

https://www.amazon.com/LEDpartsNow-...partsnow+honda+passport&qid=1610505340&sr=8-2

https://www.amazon.com/D15-Lighting...eywords=D15+led+lights&qid=1610505152&sr=8-22

Installation of the interior lights was under 30 minutes because I also did some measurements and the back-up lights were under 2 minutes. The interior lights come in several colors and since the ambient and dash lighting theme is white in the Passport, that is what I selected. I found the LEDs to be white with no blue tint and no yellow reflections from the substrate. Obviously trying to convey the color/temperature of the interior LED lights is hard because of the camera and the viewing monitor. So, if you enter your Passport the engine start button will flash an LED white ring and that is the white, I subjectively see these LEDs. Also last year I added the LED illuminated sill trim and they appear to be the same white [Photo1]. The LED back-up lights also seem to be about the same color.

The tools that I used are shown in a picture below [Photo 2]. The fuse puller was used to remove most of the lamps without using the tape trick (some lamps can be very hot). I tried using the trim removal tool that most have used but mine was a little too thick and did not work very well. So, I switched to the metal blade pry tool in the picture which worked great and I did not scratch anything. The third tool is a plastic wedge that popped out the visor fuse like lamps. The small flat blade screwdriver was used to pop off the visor plastic lenses. There is a small notch at the bottom of these lenses where the screwdriver can be inserted. If you are worried about scraping the lenses or surrounding area you could use painters’ tape, but I did not. All the interior LEDs are polarity sensitive in this kit and some are marked with a + and -. So just test and make sure they light up before re-installing the lens covers.



Row 1 in the picture [Photo 3] shows the five map/cargo LEDs. They are noticeably brighter than the stock lamps. They also dim when shutting off. The first and second row map lens can be pried off near the hinge points using the pry tool. The cargo light in the rear also pops off pretty easily using the pry tool. Row 2 are the four vanity LEDs. For me they were too bright head-on so I rotated them in slightly towards the mirror. Row 3, the first two are the smallest LEDs for the Glove compartment and the center console. I only replaced the center console and it was very easy to just pull out the round lamp bezel and then replace with the LED. The last two LEDs in Row 3 are for the front door courtesy lights and there are four tabs on the door lenses. I just used the pry tool at the top center of the lenses and popped them off. These LEDs are much brighter than the stock lamps and really light up the ground even for the back door area when it is open.

To replace the back-up lamps, you just turn the lamp holder 1/8 of a turn counter-clockwise and remove the socket and replace the 7440 lamps with the back-up LED lights [Photo 4]. The picture [Photo 5] doesn’t really show that the LEDs are much brighter than the incandescent 7440 bulbs.

The overall difference of the LEDs is great [Photo 6] and I think for the few minutes to install and the low price it is a really good modification. I liked the results so much I bought a second set of the interior LEDs as a backup the coming years. That way I do not have to worry about color matching and light output if one fails.



I made some tables [Photo 7] showing the voltage, current, and wattage of both the incandescent lamps and the LED replacements. Please note wattage (P) is the product of voltage (V) times the current (I). If you notice a slight disagreement with the equation P = V x I wattage it is because it was measured on my power supply [Photo 8 (back-up LED array) and Photo 9] and the current changes as the devices warms up. There is a huge savings in terms of power and heat so using the LEDs is a good way to go. For example, take a look at the tables showing the back-up lights. The original incandescent lamp is marked Japan 7440 12volt, 21 watts. The nominal voltage, engine off for the Passport is 12 volts and I measured 11.9 volts. However, most equipment operates when the engine is running. So, with the engine idling I measured 14.1 volts which is normal. An industry standard is set at 13.8 volts and that is the voltage I used for the tables. Therefore, the back-up lights are not 21 watts but more like 26 – 28 watts with the engine on. With the back-up LED lights you get more illumination using 3.81 watts of power then the incandescent lights using 26.3 watts! This lower wattage has the added bonus of keeping the lenses and enclosure cooler. As a side note some car systems may see the lower current as a fault and will not work properly or generate error indicators. The two kits I purchased have not had any fault or operational problems. As you know a main area that might be a problem is turn signal lights. Some problems are not blinking properly (rapid flashing) or generating error indicators. Unfortunately, the fix is adding a high wattage resistor in parallel to draw more current and fool the system. As an example, putting a 6-ohm resistor in parallel with an LED array will draw around 2 more amps, (12 v/6 ohms = 2 amps with engine off). Also, you now have a blinking light so there is a duty cycle that comes into play in determining the wattage of the components. At this time, I am not going to upgrade those lights to LEDs but maybe in the future.

Hope this was helpful and I am very happy with the upgrade.



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2021 Honda Passport Elite, White Diamond Pearl
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17 Posts
I recently installed LED interior lights and LED back-up lights on my 2019 Honda Passport Elite. I purchase the two kits at Amazon, one for all the interior lights and one for the back-up lights. The 13 white interior LED light kit was just under $20.00 and the Back-up white (6000K) LED light kit was just under $15.00.

https://www.amazon.com/LEDpartsNow-...partsnow+honda+passport&qid=1610505340&sr=8-2

https://www.amazon.com/D15-Lighting...eywords=D15+led+lights&qid=1610505152&sr=8-22

Installation of the interior lights was under 30 minutes because I also did some measurements and the back-up lights were under 2 minutes. The interior lights come in several colors and since the ambient and dash lighting theme is white in the Passport, that is what I selected. I found the LEDs to be white with no blue tint and no yellow reflections from the substrate. Obviously trying to convey the color/temperature of the interior LED lights is hard because of the camera and the viewing monitor. So, if you enter your Passport the engine start button will flash an LED white ring and that is the white, I subjectively see these LEDs. Also last year I added the LED illuminated sill trim and they appear to be the same white [Photo1]. The LED back-up lights also seem to be about the same color.

The tools that I used are shown in a picture below [Photo 2]. The fuse puller was used to remove most of the lamps without using the tape trick (some lamps can be very hot). I tried using the trim removal tool that most have used but mine was a little too thick and did not work very well. So, I switched to the metal blade pry tool in the picture which worked great and I did not scratch anything. The third tool is a plastic wedge that popped out the visor fuse like lamps. The small flat blade screwdriver was used to pop off the visor plastic lenses. There is a small notch at the bottom of these lenses where the screwdriver can be inserted. If you are worried about scraping the lenses or surrounding area you could use painters’ tape, but I did not. All the interior LEDs are polarity sensitive in this kit and some are marked with a + and -. So just test and make sure they light up before re-installing the lens covers.



Row 1 in the picture [Photo 3] shows the five map/cargo LEDs. They are noticeably brighter than the stock lamps. They also dim when shutting off. The first and second row map lens can be pried off near the hinge points using the pry tool. The cargo light in the rear also pops off pretty easily using the pry tool. Row 2 are the four vanity LEDs. For me they were too bright head-on so I rotated them in slightly towards the mirror. Row 3, the first two are the smallest LEDs for the Glove compartment and the center console. I only replaced the center console and it was very easy to just pull out the round lamp bezel and then replace with the LED. The last two LEDs in Row 3 are for the front door courtesy lights and there are four tabs on the door lenses. I just used the pry tool at the top center of the lenses and popped them off. These LEDs are much brighter than the stock lamps and really light up the ground even for the back door area when it is open.

To replace the back-up lamps, you just turn the lamp holder 1/8 of a turn counter-clockwise and remove the socket and replace the 7440 lamps with the back-up LED lights [Photo 4]. The picture [Photo 5] doesn’t really show that the LEDs are much brighter than the incandescent 7440 bulbs.

The overall difference of the LEDs is great [Photo 6] and I think for the few minutes to install and the low price it is a really good modification. I liked the results so much I bought a second set of the interior LEDs as a backup the coming years. That way I do not have to worry about color matching and light output if one fails.



I made some tables [Photo 7] showing the voltage, current, and wattage of both the incandescent lamps and the LED replacements. Please note wattage (P) is the product of voltage (V) times the current (I). If you notice a slight disagreement with the equation P = V x I wattage it is because it was measured on my power supply [Photo 8 (back-up LED array) and Photo 9] and the current changes as the devices warms up. There is a huge savings in terms of power and heat so using the LEDs is a good way to go. For example, take a look at the tables showing the back-up lights. The original incandescent lamp is marked Japan 7440 12volt, 21 watts. The nominal voltage, engine off for the Passport is 12 volts and I measured 11.9 volts. However, most equipment operates when the engine is running. So, with the engine idling I measured 14.1 volts which is normal. An industry standard is set at 13.8 volts and that is the voltage I used for the tables. Therefore, the back-up lights are not 21 watts but more like 26 – 28 watts with the engine on. With the back-up LED lights you get more illumination using 3.81 watts of power then the incandescent lights using 26.3 watts! This lower wattage has the added bonus of keeping the lenses and enclosure cooler. As a side note some car systems may see the lower current as a fault and will not work properly or generate error indicators. The two kits I purchased have not had any fault or operational problems. As you know a main area that might be a problem is turn signal lights. Some problems are not blinking properly (rapid flashing) or generating error indicators. Unfortunately, the fix is adding a high wattage resistor in parallel to draw more current and fool the system. As an example, putting a 6-ohm resistor in parallel with an LED array will draw around 2 more amps, (12 v/6 ohms = 2 amps with engine off). Also, you now have a blinking light so there is a duty cycle that comes into play in determining the wattage of the components. At this time, I am not going to upgrade those lights to LEDs but maybe in the future.

Hope this was helpful and I am very happy with the upgrade.



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Great post!! Any instructions on replacing some of the bulbs that press's the easy button and not break or chip anything? I have the first pkg that you described )interior lights) and ordered the backup lights
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Great post!! Any instructions on replacing some of the bulbs that press's the easy button and not break or chip anything? I have the first pkg that you described )interior lights) and ordered the backup lights
Glad you liked the post. Sorry I am not sure what you mean by the "easy button". In my post I show the tools that I used and I talked a little about how I popped the lens off the lights. I think you will enjoy the interior light set, I am very happy with them and they really make the interior look much better.
 

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Glad you liked the post. Sorry I am not sure what you mean by the "easy button". In my post I show the tools that I used and I talked a little about how I popped the lens off the lights. I think you will enjoy the interior light set, I am very happy with them and they really make the interior look much better.
Thanks for the quick response. It was really easy to change all but the glovebox. I found a youtube video for a Pilot that worked great for all the others. I'm still waiting on the reverse light from the big A. Thanks again!
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Fisheye, I doubt that Honda would change the physical sockets and electrical requirements on their interior lights until a major redesign. I noted in the posts on the webpage that several customers installed these LEDs in both 2021 Passports and Pilots. The vendor also has a 30 day return policy so I would go for it. They are still at the same price. Also I would like to update that the LEDs have worked very well, no problems, and I still recommend them. Hope this helps.
 
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