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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
From the press release:
  • Launching this fall, TrailSport to become the rugged halo for Honda light trucks
  • TrailSport-specific design and components to further advance the rugged direction of the brand’s existing light trucks without sacrificing on-road dynamics
  • Rugged upgrades for future to include more aggressive tires, increased ground clearance, off-road tuned suspension, underbody protection and expanded all-wheel drive capabilities
Built for adventure, TrailSport will bring a more rugged design and off-road capability, applied step-by-step, to certain models within the brand’s light truck lineup.

Over the next few model years and depending on the model, TrailSport off-road capability will further increase with upgrades like more aggressive tires, full-size spare tires, increased ground clearance, off-road tuned suspensions, underbody protection, and expanded all-wheel drive system capabilities."


The 2022 Pilot will offer a TrailSport trim, a Passport is shown in the teaser, and there's no mention of a TrailSport trim in the 2022 Ridgeline's PDI instructions.
 

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This can be very interesting!!
 

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I wonder what "expanded all wheel drive capabilities" mean, is it new hardware/software or a result of the add ons? Considering what the charge is for the HPD on the RL this could get expensive unless the Trailsport trims aren't top of the line.
 

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Sounds like full sized spares are still down the road and not imminent. What are they thinking?
I think it would be tough for them to integrate cleanly onto the current body. Putting it into the trunk might be best way to go if they do update it!
 
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Quite disappointed - thought there would me more offered at the release....not years away.
I agree, but this also makes sense. The Passport was the first one more targeted to offroading (beyond the ridgeline). And with the recent surge over last year or two of the offroading community AND passport Modders maybe they are finally catching on :D
 

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Not sure where I read it, but someone posted that Honda engineers had bought 7 lift kits from Traxda. I'm sure they bought kits from other companies as well, but I found that tidbit interesting, as shows they're researching that aspect, and not just the usual Honda game of "we'll throw on some black fender flares and AT tires and market as an offroad edition."

I also listened to the Honda podcast that featured JonDZ and his ride, and covering the impressive crawl ratio they already put into the Passport to increase offroad capability over most AWDs.

This all gives me hope for where Honda will go with this.
 

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I would hope if Honda does this, they do it right. Building an off road rig is actually very simple: Solid axles, low range and competitive approach, breakover and departure angles. BOF is more durable, but the XJ Cherokee has proven unibody can be just fine as well. Honda doesn't have a vehicle that can compete in the off road arena. That said, what attracted me to the Passport was that it DIDN'T have those things. I had a pretty competitive 4Runner with upgraded armor, diff breather, winch and appropriate recovery gear. However, I took it to the trails no more than twice a year. Simply got tired of living with the required compromises. I know the Passport is marketed as an off roadish vehicle, but that ZERO influence in my purchase decision. I bought it because it was the most spacious 2 row SUV out there and had a proven powertrain (ZF jokes aside, motor is solid). If they're going to do this, they better do it right...but I'm suspecting this package is going to be almost an appearance package like the Subaru Outback Wilderness edition.
 

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I would hope if Honda does this, they do it right. Building an off road rig is actually very simple: Solid axles, low range and competitive approach, breakover and departure angles. BOF is more durable, but the XJ Cherokee has proven unibody can be just fine as well. Honda doesn't have a vehicle that can compete in the off road arena. That said, what attracted me to the Passport was that it DIDN'T have those things. I had a pretty competitive 4Runner with upgraded armor, diff breather, winch and appropriate recovery gear. However, I took it to the trails no more than twice a year. Simply got tired of living with the required compromises. I know the Passport is marketed as an off roadish vehicle, but that ZERO influence in my purchase decision. I bought it because it was the most spacious 2 row SUV out there and had a proven powertrain (ZF jokes aside, motor is solid). If they're going to do this, they better do it right...but I'm suspecting this package is going to be almost an appearance package like the Subaru Outback Wilderness edition.
Yeah, it would be interesting to see if Honda actually went after the Wrangler/4Runner type market, but my guess is Honda will go for the offroad market exactly how they went for the light truck market with the Ridgeline, which was successful. They came out with a truck thats 95% of what people actually need.

Meaning Ridgeline was never meant to be as capable as a Tacoma, it was meant to steal Tacoma buyers who didn’t really need a Tacoma.

Similarly, for a Trailsport Passport/Ridgeline, because they don’t mention 4x4 and call out expanded AWD capabilities, I suspect their plan is to make an off-roader that’s more capable than what they have, but not a full hardcore off-roader.

I’m thinking a small lift of 2”, larger tires, different bumpers to allow improved approach/departure angles, skid plates, full-size spare under the floor, etc. Things that will make it more capable and still some more market share from Subaru, Jeep Cherokee/Grand Cherokees, some 4Runner folks, etc.
 

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Yeah, it would be interesting to see if Honda actually went after the Wrangler/4Runner type market, but my guess is Honda will go for the offroad market exactly how they went for the light truck market with the Ridgeline, which was successful. They came out with a truck thats 95% of what people actually need.

Meaning Ridgeline was never meant to be as capable as a Tacoma, it was meant to steal Tacoma buyers who didn’t really need a Tacoma.

Similarly, for a Trailsport Passport/Ridgeline, because they don’t mention 4x4 and call out expanded AWD capabilities, I suspect their plan is to make an off-roader that’s more capable than what they have, but not a full hardcore off-roader.

I’m thinking a small lift of 2”, larger tires, different bumpers to allow improved approach/departure angles, skid plates, full-size spare under the floor, etc. Things that will make it more capable and still some more market share from Subaru, Jeep Cherokee/Grand Cherokees, some 4Runner folks, etc.
You’re not wrong about the Ridgeline being all the truck 95% needs. Problem is it’s way overpriced. The Tacoma starts $10,000 lower than the Ridgeline. That’s not nothing.
 

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I don’t think Honda will position this “off road” Passport to compete with 4Runner or Wrangler or Bronco. This thing will never be body on frame with solid axles and for majority of people it really doesn’t have to be. I dare to say that majority of 4Runner or Wrangler buyers never really utilize off road capabilities of those cars but instead they have to live with the compromised ride and handling for every day driving.
My prediction is that it will follow the Ridgeline as being good enough for 90% of people that occasionally venture off road and with some extra bolt-on bits and pieces and cosmetics improvements, it will be a compelling product. Hope it won’t be too expensive.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
You’re not wrong about the Ridgeline being all the truck 95% needs. Problem is it’s way overpriced. The Tacoma starts $10,000 lower than the Ridgeline. That’s not nothing.
You also get $10,000 less equipment, too - including a 4-cylinder engine, no AWD, no Toyota Safety Sense (similar to Honda Sensing), no remote keyless entry, no HomeLink, steel wheels, manual climate control, etc.

Honda offered a cheaper Ridgeline (the RT) - hardly anyone bought it. They offered a 2WD Ridgeline - hardly anyone bought it.
 

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You also get $10,000 less equipment, too - including a 4-cylinder engine, no AWD, no Toyota Safety Sense (similar to Honda Sensing), no remote keyless entry, no HomeLink, steel wheels, manual climate control, etc.

Honda offered a cheaper Ridgeline (the RT) - hardly anyone bought it. They offered a 2WD Ridgeline - hardly anyone bought it.
Yeah, that’s just flat wrong. Go to the Toyota website and build a Toyota Tacoma. Base SR has Toyota safety sense. Has Apple car play. Dual climate control. For twenty six grand. You’re correct the base taco is RWD and a 4 cyl. But it’s TEN GRAND CHEAPER.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 · (Edited)
We must not be seeing the same Toyota website. :)

When I build a V6 4WD SR, the price is $33,935. A V6 AWD Ridgeline is $37,315 - a difference of $3,780 - not $10,000.
 

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We must not be seeing the same Toyota website. :)

When I build a V6 4WD SR, the price is $33,935. A V6 AWD Ridgeline is $37,315 - a difference of $3,780 - not $10,000.
it's OK dude, words are hard. I told you the base SR is 10 grand cheaper than a base Ridgeline. You said it doesn't come with Toyota safety sense, has manual climate controls and all other things. I told you it starts at 26k with Toyota safety sense, apple car play and other things and then granted you the base Toyota for 10 grand less does have a 4 cyl and RWD but I again pointed out it's TEN GRAND cheaper. Below is the screen shot of the base Taco for 10 grand cheaper than the Ridgeline and having the features you say it didn't.

Product Font Material property Screenshot Parallel


But the funniest thing is, you then go build a Taco with a V6 and 4x4 and it's STILL $3,700 cheaper than a Ridgeline. It's OK to admit the Ridgeline is overpriced. Promise.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
it's OK dude, words are hard. I told you the base SR is 10 grand cheaper than a base Ridgeline. You said it doesn't come with Toyota safety sense, has manual climate controls and all other things. I told you it starts at 26k with Toyota safety sense, apple car play and other things and then granted you the base Toyota for 10 grand less does have a 4 cyl and RWD but I again pointed out it's TEN GRAND cheaper. Below is the screen shot of the base Taco for 10 grand cheaper than the Ridgeline and having the features you say it didn't.

But the funniest thing is, you then go build a Taco with a V6 and 4x4 and it's STILL $3,700 cheaper than a Ridgeline. It's OK to admit the Ridgeline is overpriced. Promise.
I overlooked that Toyota Safety Sense is standard. The I4 doesn't have automatic climate control (notice it says "V6 only").

And, a V6 4WD Tacoma for $33,935 ($3,780 less than the least expensive Ridgeline) still doesn't have:

  • Remote keyless entry
  • Aluminum wheels
  • Subwoofer
  • Individual tire pressure alerts and tire fill assist
  • Fog lights
  • Power locking tailgate
  • Bed lights
  • In bed trunk
  • Dual hinged tailgate
  • Push button start
  • Paddle shifters
  • Rear window defroster
  • HomeLink
  • Bright exhaust finishers

Then, there's the Ridgeline's larger cabin and ride and handling advantages of unibody construction, independent suspension, and torque-vectoring AWD system. And, the Tacoma's rear seat bottoms don't fold up like the Ridgeline's.

Add all those features to the Tacoma and tell me how much of that $3,780 difference you still have left. :)
 

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I overlooked that Toyota Safety Sense is standard. The I4 doesn't have automatic climate control (notice it says "V6 only").

And, a V6 4WD Tacoma for $33,935 ($3,780 less than the least expensive Ridgeline) still doesn't have:

  • Remote keyless entry
  • Aluminum wheels
  • Subwoofer
  • Individual tire pressure alerts and tire fill assist
  • Fog lights
  • Power locking tailgate
  • Bed lights
  • In bed trunk
  • Dual hinged tailgate
  • Push button start
  • Paddle shifters
  • Rear window defroster
  • HomeLink
  • Bright exhaust finishers

Then, there's the Ridgeline's larger cabin and ride and handling advantages of unibody construction, independent suspension, and torque-vectoring AWD system. And, the Tacoma's rear seat bottoms don't fold up like the Ridgeline's.

Add all those features to the Tacoma and tell me how much of that $3,780 difference you still have left. :)
You’re right, I’m wrong. The Ridgeline is a far superior vehicle for the money. That’s why Honda sells so many of them.
 
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