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Interesting. I've had my AEM intake installed for about 15,000 miles. Not a single issue. Just removed it this weekend - not there is anything wrong, just want to drive around with the OEM set-up as a comparison.
Hows the car driving when comparing both experiences with and without the intake
 

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So it seems the bottom end is a bit quicker or more responsive with the OEM. WOT though is not as strong. Running S mode all the time so I'm also seeing how my fuel mileage is too. Haven't gone through a tank yet.
 

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2019 Touring: since March-2019
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WOT is WOT?,

oops, I mean What is WOT?
 

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^ Yes. Wide Open Throttle. You know, when you smash the pedal down. ;)
 

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Interesting new video . . . actual dyno video of Honda 3.5L engine (tested in 2017 Ridgeline).
I typically considered most aftermarket cone filters as only producing more 'power' via intske noise to your ears, and/or for owners proclaiming more power as proven only by their seat-of-the-pants dyno in their fartcan exhaust rollerskate car.

Dyno comparison of OEM airbox vs AEM cone airbox

This video has interesting actual dyno results, showing real world increases in torque and horsepower.
True, majority of increases are at the high rpm range . . . unlikely most Passport owners regularly drive in the 5500 and higher rpm range. It appears increases really only at these high rpm ranges when Honda V-TEC kicks in. Since I rarely drive in this rpm range, this intake wouldn't benefit me at all. But may be useful in circumstances such as towing a trailer uphill or heavy acceleration when passing.
 
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2019 Elite B.F,2020 Ridgeline
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Tricky business testing that 9 speed and finding the sweet spot. Overall I agree that the difference at the 5500 RPM would have no real benefit to me. If I did make that choice I would be certain to include the hydrophobic sleeve. Even though it's a "bolt on" and shouldn't void warranty, if it hydrolocked after going through deep water and they could prove the cone sits at any position other than OEM, I guess I'd worry I might have a situation on my hands.
 

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Just because I have to as many of my motorcycling friends get caught up in this argument/trend.

Honda, and other manufacturers, spend literally millions of dollars (maybe 10s of) of R+D on intakes, exhausts and other features of our vehicles.

Then we think we can spend hundreds of dollars making them better? I don't think so. It just doesn't make sense to me, mathematically speaking. If you get a higher HP number at 6000 RPM? Do you give up somewhere else in the curve?

Just saying, feel free to troll. My two cents spent.

Mike
 

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^ Without a doubt some truth to that. However, vehicles are going to be designed to keep in check with government regulations. And with some OEMs that offer intakes (e.g., Toyota and their TRD brand) they're doing it for marketing or possibly for some performance increase. My guess it's a bit of both. I do find it hard to believe, though, that an OEM engine with OEM intake is "maxed out" from the factory. There is always some horsepower gains to be made; whether it correlates to noticeable gains on a dyno is what is debatable.
 

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My guess it's a bit of both. I do find it hard to believe, though, that an OEM engine with OEM intake is "maxed out" from the factory. There is always some horsepower gains to be made; whether it correlates to noticeable gains on a dyno is what is debatable.
Can't argue solid logic like that. I'll go along with that.

Mike
 

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There are a couple of truisms in engine performance modifications I've seen in 35-plus years of professional hands-on automotive parts, engine building and modification (not just cars either) What an engine typically gains in high-rpm power increases it typically loses power somewhere else in the powerband. Full blown race engines are built with one basic goal, fastest acceleration and maximum peak power at a survivable rpm level. Street-able performance motors are a different critter all together and EFI/GDI engines are far less tolerant of inaccurate fueling than any other engine, especially in turbo applications. Without monitoring the air/fuel during normal operation there may very well be some lean fueling conditions that the factory software map can't compensate for, and possible piston ring damage or the upper portion above the rings can sustain damage without much warning. If the computer detects a detonation condition or lean condition it MAY cut back on engine timing, VVT actuation and possibly try increasing fuel to cool things down. I have to speculate as to how many engines have ultimately failed the "Butt Dyno" test and rewarded the "tuner" with a damaged engine but I'm not sure I can count that high. These engines are capable of reliably delivering 280 HP at the crank, is a measly 2-4 HP possible increase really worth the potential risk down the road ? I think not...
 

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^ Without a doubt some truth to that. However, vehicles are going to be designed to keep in check with government regulations. And with some OEMs that offer intakes (e.g., Toyota and their TRD brand) they're doing it for marketing or possibly for some performance increase. My guess it's a bit of both. I do find it hard to believe, though, that an OEM engine with OEM intake is "maxed out" from the factory. There is always some horsepower gains to be made; whether it correlates to noticeable gains on a dyno is what is debatable.
I agree, I've always had fast cars and motorcycles, well no more fast motorcycles bec of the wife. ;)
IMO lots of vehicles are so detuned because of Gov regulations.
 

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There are a couple of truisms in engine performance modifications I've seen in 35-plus years of professional hands-on automotive parts, engine building and modification (not just cars either) What an engine typically gains in high-rpm power increases it typically loses power somewhere else in the powerband. Full blown race engines are built with one basic goal, fastest acceleration and maximum peak power at a survivable rpm level. Street-able performance motors are a different critter all together and EFI/GDI engines are far less tolerant of inaccurate fueling than any other engine, especially in turbo applications. Without monitoring the air/fuel during normal operation there may very well be some lean fueling conditions that the factory software map can't compensate for, and possible piston ring damage or the upper portion above the rings can sustain damage without much warning. If the computer detects a detonation condition or lean condition it MAY cut back on engine timing, VVT actuation and possibly try increasing fuel to cool things down. I have to speculate as to how many engines have ultimately failed the "Butt Dyno" test and rewarded the "tuner" with a damaged engine but I'm not sure I can count that high. These engines are capable of reliably delivering 280 HP at the crank, is a measly 2-4 HP possible increase really worth the potential risk down the road ? I think not...
Having said all that, I'd really like a twin turbo set up for this thing. I think around 360-400 horsepower would be nice. And if the transmission would take it, even more. Don't these ZF transmission get used in all kinds of vehicles with much more power than ours?
 

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Yup, Audi RS7 4.0 v8 twin turbo use a ZF tranny and I heard the Hellcat uses one as well.
 

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Good luck running a 11.0 CR engine with twin turbo's folks, won't even make it to next tank of fuel before it detonates itself to pieces. You have (much) better odds with a progressive NOS wet system and a piggy back EFI controller, for a fraction of what custom pistons, crankshaft, connecting rods turbo's and other parts will cost. HD valve springs and retainers mandatory of course. Not sure how long the ZF box will last with a 75-100 HP shot, but I believe the units Jaguar and other performance cars have upgraded internals to handle the more-than-double torque output those engines make. A transmission cooler would help but hard to predict longevity.
 

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I can confirm the AEM cold air intake made for Ridgelines/Pilots fits Passports perfectly. I had one on the ridgeline I traded for my Passport and swapped it over easily. Definitely feel it in the butt dyno, vtec sounds awesome, and the intake sounds even cooler on the passport due to the sportier oem exhaust. Gives it a nice growl at low rpms.
It’s fits but triggered a check engine light
 

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Just install the performance filter. EOM air box is done fairly well. Custom air intake is not worth the money.

This guy has a few videos where he compare on dyno drop in filters vs intake on Honda Ridgeline. The difference is minimal and drop in filters do well.

 
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