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    1. · Registered
      2019 Passport Elite
      Joined
      ·
      1 Posts
      Hi, All – I wanted to thank everyone for the content you’ve added to this forum. For over a year, I’ve read and re-read these postings, trying to get up the courage to attempt this. I consider myself very handy and no stranger to tools yet had reservations. Finally, I said screw it and decided to do it. The whole process went extremely well and I wanted to return the favor by sharing my experience and some tips. Maybe it’ll help someone get off the fence and give them the courage to try it. I didn’t do the ATF, yet, I’m considering it. My boat is under 3000lbs and I only tow it 4 times a year.

      Know what you’re getting into – Understand your comfort level. Do your homework. Read these forums. Find out what parts you need. Download the PDF instructions and read them cover to cover. Make sure you understand the process and plan ahead. Once you get into it, take your time.

      Order your parts – I looked at several sites for the best deals. I ended up ordering from BKHondaParts.com. I found a promo code for half off shipping. The whole thing cost me $528.77. For my Passport Elite I needed:
      • 08L92-TGS-100 - Trailer Hitch
      • 08L91-TGS-100 - Trailer Hitch Wiring Harness
      • 08L91-TGS-100A - Hands Free Power Tailgate Sensor Adapter
      This is where it gets interesting. After ordering my parts I found out the Tailgate Sensor Adapter was on backorder. I canceled that part of the order and ordered elsewhere. Then I found out it’s a nationwide backorder and there’s no confirmed ETA. So, I canceled that order and started emailing other sites asking if they had the part in stock. Most responses did nothing but confirm the backorder except for one; Tim at OEMAcuraParts.com. He went above and beyond by giving me a list of phone numbers for dealers who showed the part in stock. There happened to be a dealer an hour away so I purchased the part over the phone and drove out to get it.

      Gather your tools – For me, the best part of any project is getting new tools. I had most of what I needed but there were a few things I picked up and since I got them from Harbor Freight, they were inexpensive:
      Install the wiring – I wasn’t sure what order to start in. I did this first mostly because I was still trying to sort out the kick sensor issue at the time. Basically, I only removed the toolbox and pocket. I did break one of the tabs on the pocket (inside tab facing the front). Knowing now how it’s held in; I think I could have reached up higher from the bottom side to pull that tab in. I tried removing the tiedowns but it was like they were put in with an air wrench. I didn’t want to strip the screw so worked within the confines of the pocket. The hardest part was freeing the harness taped to the loom up under the panel. I was able to carefully get a small flat head screw driver in there between the two looms to tear the tape and then pull it apart. Since I didn’t have all the parts for this hitch yet I just zip-tied the harness safely under the car.

      Ready the new hitch cover and sensor – I trimmed the new kick sensor and plug cutout using an oscillating tool.

      Remove the current hitch cover – This is one of the reasons I almost didn’t attempt the project; I didn’t want to have to remove the bumper. I prepared myself for the worst but ended up not needing to remove the bumper. As others mentioned, the top part of the cover was the most difficult. It is very tight up there. I managed to remove the bottom part easily using a small flat head to pop the clips up and then my panel clip pliers to remove them. I freed the side retaining tabs easy enough. The nut on the driver’s side wasn’t too bad, the passenger side was harder, but the retaining tabs on the top were the toughest. I was able to reach the first one on the driver’s side. Then I used one of the spare molding tools to wedge between the cover and the bumper on the outside to keep tension on the cover. I didn’t want the clips to re-engage. To remove the rest, I carefully probed around from the outside of the car inward with a thin butter knife. After releasing each clip, I’d slid the molding tool to keep tension and move on to the next clip. This went way better than expected and I didn’t mar any part of the bumper or break any clips. Installation of the new cover was easy and I basically did everything backwards.

      Prepare for the hitch install – I can’t stress this one enough - dry fit the bolts first. The instructions don’t say anything about this, maybe because they assume the car is brand new, but I could tell there was a lot of debris where the bolts go. You don’t want to run into issues when you’re trying to mount the hitch. I cleaned out the holes using steel wool and some lubricant and then tried the bolts. They wouldn’t go. It was almost as if they were the wrong size. I was afraid to cross thread them so, I cleaned them more. What helped the most was using a pipe cleaner from my copper pipe soldering set. I was able to really get in there and clean the debris out. It took a few times but after that I was able to get the bolts in without feeling like I might be stripping them.

      Install the hitch – Admittedly I didn’t plan too far ahead for how I was going to do this. They talk about this being a two-person job. I figured I’d just use some combination of a floor jack and make-shift platform and then it hit me; I could use my lawnmower lift. I felt like a genius and it couldn’t have worked any better. All the pre-fitting of bolts made the mounting extremely easy and I followed the instructions for torqueing the bolts.

      That’s about it. I haven’t yet towed anything. I plan to be getting my boat out of storage soon and that’ll be my first attempt. Best of luck to all of you. I hope you find this helpful.

      10824


      10825


      10826
       
    2. · Registered
      Joined
      ·
      8 Posts
      Hi, All – I wanted to thank everyone for the content you’ve added to this forum. For over a year, I’ve read and re-read these postings, trying to get up the courage to attempt this. I consider myself very handy and no stranger to tools yet had reservations. Finally, I said screw it and decided to do it. The whole process went extremely well and I wanted to return the favor by sharing my experience and some tips. Maybe it’ll help someone get off the fence and give them the courage to try it. I didn’t do the ATF, yet, I’m considering it. My boat is under 3000lbs and I only tow it 4 times a year.

      Know what you’re getting into – Understand your comfort level. Do your homework. Read these forums. Find out what parts you need. Download the PDF instructions and read them cover to cover. Make sure you understand the process and plan ahead. Once you get into it, take your time.

      Order your parts – I looked at several sites for the best deals. I ended up ordering from BKHondaParts.com. I found a promo code for half off shipping. The whole thing cost me $528.77. For my Passport Elite I needed:
      • 08L92-TGS-100 - Trailer Hitch
      • 08L91-TGS-100 - Trailer Hitch Wiring Harness
      • 08L91-TGS-100A - Hands Free Power Tailgate Sensor Adapter
      This is where it gets interesting. After ordering my parts I found out the Tailgate Sensor Adapter was on backorder. I canceled that part of the order and ordered elsewhere. Then I found out it’s a nationwide backorder and there’s no confirmed ETA. So, I canceled that order and started emailing other sites asking if they had the part in stock. Most responses did nothing but confirm the backorder except for one; Tim at OEMAcuraParts.com. He went above and beyond by giving me a list of phone numbers for dealers who showed the part in stock. There happened to be a dealer an hour away so I purchased the part over the phone and drove out to get it.

      Gather your tools – For me, the best part of any project is getting new tools. I had most of what I needed but there were a few things I picked up and since I got them from Harbor Freight, they were inexpensive:
      Install the wiring – I wasn’t sure what order to start in. I did this first mostly because I was still trying to sort out the kick sensor issue at the time. Basically, I only removed the toolbox and pocket. I did break one of the tabs on the pocket (inside tab facing the front). Knowing now how it’s held in; I think I could have reached up higher from the bottom side to pull that tab in. I tried removing the tiedowns but it was like they were put in with an air wrench. I didn’t want to strip the screw so worked within the confines of the pocket. The hardest part was freeing the harness taped to the loom up under the panel. I was able to carefully get a small flat head screw driver in there between the two looms to tear the tape and then pull it apart. Since I didn’t have all the parts for this hitch yet I just zip-tied the harness safely under the car.

      Ready the new hitch cover and sensor – I trimmed the new kick sensor and plug cutout using an oscillating tool.

      Remove the current hitch cover – This is one of the reasons I almost didn’t attempt the project; I didn’t want to have to remove the bumper. I prepared myself for the worst but ended up not needing to remove the bumper. As others mentioned, the top part of the cover was the most difficult. It is very tight up there. I managed to remove the bottom part easily using a small flat head to pop the clips up and then my panel clip pliers to remove them. I freed the side retaining tabs easy enough. The nut on the driver’s side wasn’t too bad, the passenger side was harder, but the retaining tabs on the top were the toughest. I was able to reach the first one on the driver’s side. Then I used one of the spare molding tools to wedge between the cover and the bumper on the outside to keep tension on the cover. I didn’t want the clips to re-engage. To remove the rest, I carefully probed around from the outside of the car inward with a thin butter knife. After releasing each clip, I’d slid the molding tool to keep tension and move on to the next clip. This went way better than expected and I didn’t mar any part of the bumper or break any clips. Installation of the new cover was easy and I basically did everything backwards.

      Prepare for the hitch install – I can’t stress this one enough - dry fit the bolts first. The instructions don’t say anything about this, maybe because they assume the car is brand new, but I could tell there was a lot of debris where the bolts go. You don’t want to run into issues when you’re trying to mount the hitch. I cleaned out the holes using steel wool and some lubricant and then tried the bolts. They wouldn’t go. It was almost as if they were the wrong size. I was afraid to cross thread them so, I cleaned them more. What helped the most was using a pipe cleaner from my copper pipe soldering set. I was able to really get in there and clean the debris out. It took a few times but after that I was able to get the bolts in without feeling like I might be stripping them.

      Install the hitch – Admittedly I didn’t plan too far ahead for how I was going to do this. They talk about this being a two-person job. I figured I’d just use some combination of a floor jack and make-shift platform and then it hit me; I could use my lawnmower lift. I felt like a genius and it couldn’t have worked any better. All the pre-fitting of bolts made the mounting extremely easy and I followed the instructions for torqueing the bolts.

      That’s about it. I haven’t yet towed anything. I plan to be getting my boat out of storage soon and that’ll be my first attempt. Best of luck to all of you. I hope you find this helpful.

      View attachment 10824

      View attachment 10825

      View attachment 10826
      What did you do with your larger of the two pieces of the hands-free sensors access unit once you installed it back to the rear bumper lower cover? My questions are:

      1. Can you throw away the larger of the two pieces that are cut with an air saw from the accessory hands-free access unit?
      2. Where does the extra length of the sensor bars go once the accessory hands-free access unit gets cut? There are plastic slots that the long pieces snap into place. It almost looks like they get cut down to a shorter length
      I will add two comments to this thread that apply the owners with hands-free access unit only:
      1. The sensor bars are labeled as "top" and "bottom" - just an FYI to put them back in the right position
      2. After cutting the accessory hands-free access unit, you will have "leftover" parts from your installation, specifically six (6) self-tapping screws and three (3) clips. I was having a hard time understanding why I had leftover pieces until I placed the cut accessory hands-free access unit cut piece back onto the original rear bumper lower cover and realized that this is where the pieces originally went.
       

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